• John Larrimer

Why Are Ohio Medical Records Hard to Get?

The Columbus Dispatch recently had a troubling story indicating that many Ohioans are having trouble obtaining copies of their medical records due to costs.

According to the newspaper, Ohio citizens are often asked to pay hospitals, doctors and providers some of the highest fees in the country for access to their medical records.

Many states have laws specifying the maximum amounts people can be charged for records; however, in Ohio, some providers can charge as much as $3.07 per page for the first 10 pages of a person’s records and lesser amounts for additional pages.

“Of the 45 states that specify the maximum costs for copies of medical records, Ohio ranks seventh in the cost of medical records that number 10 or 25 pages, 11th for medical records that number 50 pages and 19th for records that number 100 pages,” the Dispatch reported.

Ohio’s neighboring states are much cheaper. In Kentucky, the first copy of a medical record must be provided at no charge to the patient, the newspaper noted. To read the Dispatch report, you can click on the source link below.

Unfortunately, the fact that many providers still default to paper copies when providing medical records in one reason requests are so pricey. Expensive costs associated with medical records can hurt people who are looking into collecting workers’ compensation benefits.

Medical Records and Workers’ Compensation in Ohio

In Ohio, when applying for workers’ compensation, you may be asked to share portions of your medical records with third parties in order to obtain benefits.

If you are hurt in a workplace accident, you may be asked to verify the validity of your injury claim through your employer or an insurer through documentation. However, this does not mean that it will have enfettered access to your medical history without your permission.

This is why it is often in an applicant’s best interest to work with an attorney when applying for workers’ compensation. If you have questions about access to your medical records, confidentiality and costs, he or she may be able to provide you with answers.

Source: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2015/11/29/in-ohio-records-cost-hefty.html

#Healthcare

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