• John Larrimer

OSHA Awards $10.1 Million in Safety and Health Training Grants

On September 16, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) awarded $10.1 million in safety and health training grants. According to an OSHA news release, the grants were awarded to 70 organizations, including nonprofits, community and faith-based organizations, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor and management associations and colleges and universities.

The grants were awarded through the Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, which provides one-year grants to support education and training programs for workers and employers. The program is designed to help workers and employers recognize workplace safety and health hazards, inform workers and employers of their rights and responsibilities and teach employers how to implement injury prevention measures.

“These grants reflect the department’s commitment to ensuring all workers and employers have the tools and skills to identify hazards and prevent injuries,” said Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “By further advancing a culture of workplace safety and health, we help to eliminate the false choice between enhancing workplace safety and productivity.”

The program targets small business employers, workers who are young, workers and employers in industries with high injury and fatality rates and workers who have limited English proficiency. The training provided by the program includes hands-on training, guidance on creating training materials and educational programs.

“The programs funded by these grants are one of the most effective resources we have for providing important hands-on training and education to hard-to-reach workers in small businesses and dangerous jobs,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels.

In addition to the traditional programs targeted by these grants, OSHA has designated $1.6 million for topics not included in the 2012 program, such as hair and nail salon hazards, fall protection in construction, ergonomic hazards, workplace violence, agricultural safety, hazard communication for chemical exposure and injury and illness prevention.

There is more information available on our site about workplace safety. If you or someone you know have had your workplace rights violated, we may be able to help. Our Columbus workers’ comp firm has been defending the rights of injured workers for 85 years, and our attorneys have the skills and resources to help you hold those at fault accountable for all your pain and suffering.

For more information on how we can help you make sure that you do not miss out on your full workers’ comp or Social Security disability claim, contact our firm today to schedule a free consultation.

Did You Know?: On average, more than 12 workers die on the job in the US each day, which adds up to over 4,500 a year.

Larrimer & Larrimer, LLC—Columbus Workers Comp Attorneys

#socialsecuritydisability #WorkersComp

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