• John Larrimer

Does OSHA Work With Businesses?

Construction companies and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) do not always have to have an antagonistic relationship. In fact, through OSHA’s strategic partnership program, businesses and workers can mutually benefit by working alongside OSHA throughout the course of a project. As such, OSHA helps the business establish training goals and safety strategies to prevent workplace injuries. Strategic partnerships help out the businesses involved because they lose fewer workers to injury and illness and are less likely to face costly lawsuits from injured workers.

“Through these relationships, we aim to control or eliminate serious workplace construction hazards and build a foundation for an effective safety and health program,” said the OSHA area director in North Aurora. “The partnership plans to meet these goals through increased training, implementation of best work practices, site-specific written safety and health programs, including a heat stress program, and compliance with applicable OSHA standards and regulations.”

Most recently, OSHA has joined forces with R.C. Wegman Construction Co. and the Fox Valley Building and Construction Trades to assist in the development of a new public library. Specifically, OSHA will focus on improving training techniques to prevent common construction site injuries, such as falls, trenching and electrical hazards.

Will My Boss Fire Me If I Speak Out About Workplace Safety?

Unfortunately, most businesses do not opt to form partnerships with OSHA and, instead, attempt to avoid implementing safe workplace practices. If your employer disregards workplace safety, consider consulting a workers compensation attorney before it is too late. There is no reason to wait until after a workplace injury to consider legal action.

[Did You Know: The 93,000 square-foot public library will likely be completed in spring of 2015.]

Larrimer & Larrimer, LLC—Columbus Workers Comp Attorneys

Source: https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=25914

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