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  • John Larrimer

Do Companies Still Expose Their Workers To Lead?

Most feel that lead poisoning is a thing of the past, but two Ohio companies were recently found guilty of exposing their workers to dangerous amounts of lead based paint. Durable Slate Co. and Spectrum Painting were in charge of restoring an old historical building in Ohio. A healthcare provider found excessive amounts of lead in the blood of employees working at the Lima building and informed the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Lead exposure is highly dangerous and can cause permanent damage to the central nervous system.

“Lead overexposure is a leading cause of serious workplace illness,” said the OSHA area director in Toledo. “Compliance with OSHA’s standards will protect workers by minimizing their exposure to lead. Companies that specialize in this work must have an effective program to ensure the safety and health of their workers.”

OSHA has fined Durable Slate and Spectrum Painting $119,000 and $49,000, respectively. Both companies failed to inform the workers on the dangers of lead removal and provide adequate protection against lead exposure.

If you or a co-worker has been exposed to lead without proper protection, it is imperative that you reach out to our Columbus workers compensation attorneys immediately. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lead exposure can cause heart issues, kidney failure, cognitive decay and reproductive complications. The Larrimer & Larrimer, LLC legal team will secure the full compensation that you deserve for the medical costs and emotional trauma induced by the lead exposure. For more information, contact us at (614) 221-7548.

[Did You Know: Since the CDC addressed lead exposure 20 years ago, there has been a 54 percent decrease in lead exposure to workers in the US.]

Larrimer & Larrimer, LLC—Columbus Workers Comp Attorneys

Source: https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=25770, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/ABLES/description.html

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