• John Larrimer

Why You Should Give Your Teenager Workplace Safety Tips for Summer Jobs

Department of Labor statistics show teenage employees entering the workforce for the first time are twice as likely to suffer serious injuries on the job than adults. Young workers can also fall victim to fatal work accidents. According to the Department of Labor, teenage workers are often victims of poor training, dangerous equipment and poor supervision from superiors.

Some employers may even ask teenage workers to perform job-related tasks illegal for their age. According to the Department of Labor, homicides, motor vehicle accidents, electrocution, falls and machine-related incidents are responsible for the majority of fatal workplace accidents among teenagers. For teenagers that do not lose their lives, burns, cuts, sprains, broken bones, concussions and even amputations are possible.

Workplace Safety Tips Parents Can Share with Their Teenagers

Fortunately, parents can play a large role in ensuring that their children are kept safe while performing summer jobs.

  1. Encourage your child to ask his or her employer safety-related questions. Communicating concerns with employers can help address existing safety problems and establish knowledge of what your child should avoid at the workplace.

  2. Make sure that both you and your child know laws that govern workplace safety for teenagers. If your child is asked to work with certain chemicals, forklifts, explosives or machinery, an employer may have broken the law.

  3. As a parent, know the potential hazards present at your child’s workplace. Ask the employer whether the business has alarms after certain hours or whether the doors are locked at a specific time. You can also ask employers what types of safety equipment workers use.

  4. Always make sure your child has been properly trained by his or her employer. Lack of training is a primary reason young workers are injured.

Summer jobs are a great way to pick up experience and earn money, but they can come with risks. Parents may use these tips to possibly reduce the risk their children are injured in workplace accidents.

The Columbus workers’ comp attorneys at Larrimer & Larrimer wish you and your family a happy and safe summer! For regular updates on workplace safety, follow us on Twitter.

#SummerJob

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